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Food Industry In Some Parts Of Europe Under Pressure As CO2 Runs Short

A shortage of the gas carbon dioxide (CO2) is putting pressure on food sectors in some European countries, after major producers cut output in response to rising energy costs.

Chemical makers produce CO2 as a byproduct used in parts of the food industry, ranging from putting the fizz into drinks and cooling products during transport to stunning poultry and pigs before slaughter.

Here are some countries that flagged shortages, after major producers cut output:

Britain 

Britain's food and drinks industry urged the government to prepare contingency plans to ensure supplies of carbon dioxide after the main domestic supplier, CF Fertilisers UK, decided to temporarily halt ammonia production at its Billingham plant in northeast England.

Italy 

In July, Italian drinks companies flagged production cuts due to trouble with sourcing carbon dioxide, as chemical companies slashed output, blaming soaring gas prices and suppliers struggled to secure necessary volumes.

Poland

Danish brewery Carlsberg's subsidiary in Poland could cut or halt beer production due to a lack of carbon dioxide deliveries.

The delivery halt also poses a danger to the nation's food security, said Andrzej Gantner, general secretary of the Polish Federation of Food Industry.

News by Reuters, edited by Donna Ahern, Checkout. For more supply chain stories, click here. Click subscribe to sign up for the Checkout print edition.

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