Subscribe Login
Retail

Half Of Irish Shoppers Buy Snacks Once A Week

Over half (55%) of Irish shoppers buy snacks such as crisps, popcorn, nuts or crackers at least once a week, according to the latest Consumer Insights survey by Empathy Research.

Of 950 participants, 61% of those with children buy snacks at least once a week, while just 50% of those without children buy snacks that often. The under 45 age groups were the most likely to buy snacks at least once a week: 18-24 (72%), 25-34 (62%), 35-44 (65%) and 45+ (44%).

When questioned about where shoppers typically buy their snacks, the majority (86%) of the survey respondents said they purchase from supermarkets, however those aged 18-24 years were the least likely (77%) to buy snacks in a supermarket.

Just over one in five (22%) of those who do buy snacks said they buy them from convenience stores, although this was more likely among men (28%) than women (16%). Shoppers with children were also less likely (16%) to buy from a convenience store when looking for snacks, than non-parents (27%). Similarly, the older age groups were less likely to buy snacks from a convenience store than the younger groups; 18-24 (57%), 25-34 (30%), 35-44 (19%) and 45+ (10%).

The biggest influence on shoppers when buying snacks were price (27%) and flavour (27%), followed by brand (19%), promotions (15%) and availability in multipack (7%).

Click here for more information from Empathy Research.

© 2014 - Checkout Magazine by Genna Patterson

Stay Connected With Our Weekly Newsletter

Processing your request...

Thanks! please check your email to confirm your subscription.

Stay connected with our weekly newsletter
Enjoy the most important stories from the world of Irish grocery retail, curated for you by our team of experts every week.
Stay connected with our weekly newsletter
Stay connected with our weekly newsletter
Enjoy the most important stories from the world of Irish grocery retail, curated for you by our team of experts every week.
Stay connected with our weekly newsletter